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Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Country club facing lawsuit from customer who claims a waiter spilled red wine on her $30,000 Hermes handbag says the purse is a FAKE

  • Maryana Beyder filed a $30,000 lawsuit against Alpine Country Club late last month, alleging that a server spilled red wine on her Hermès Kelly bag
  • A lawyer for the club, Ken Merber, has now alleged that the bag is a counterfeit 
  • Merber said an expert examined the bag and found 'serious issues regarding the authenticity'  
  • Beyder's attorney, Alexandra Errico, staunchly denied the counterfeit claim
  • She insisted that her legal team is armed with two authentication reports 
  • The club is now also suing the waiter allegedly responsible for the spill 
 A New Jersey country club that is being sued after a waiter allegedly spilled red wine on a customer's $30,000 Hermès handbag has claimed the purse is a fake.  The attorney representing Alpine Country Club, Ken Merber, said that the establishment had Maryana Beyder's handbag 'examined by an expert' after she accused a server of dousing it and her in red wine while she dined there last fall. 
  • There are serious issues regarding the authenticity of the bag,' Merber said.  
    'Plaintiff has not provided any receipt pertaining to the purchase of the subject handbag,' the attorney added in a statement to DailyMail.com. 
    Beyder's lawyer, Alexandra Errico, staunchly denied the counterfeit claim, insisting that her legal team is armed with two authentication reports. 
    'She would not be suing for the value of the bag if the bag wasn't authentic,' Errico said.  
    A New Jersey country club that is being sued after a waiter allegedly spilled red wine on a customer Maryana Beyder's Hermès handbag has claimed the purse is a fake. Beyder (pictured) filed her lawsuit against the club late last month, demanding $30,000 in damages
    The attorney representing Alpine Country Club said that the establishment had Maryana Beyder's handbag 'examined by an expert' who found 'serious issues regarding the authenticity of the bag'. Hermès bags retail for tens of thousands of dollars (file photo)
    The attorney representing Alpine Country Club said that the establishment had Maryana Beyder's handbag 'examined by an expert' who found 'serious issues regarding the authenticity of the bag'. Hermès bags retail for tens of thousands of dollars (file photo)
    Beyder filed her suit against the Alpine Country Club late last month, demanding $30,000 in damages for her soiled Hermès Kelly bag. 
    The club responded to the suit by denying any liability and filing a second suit against the waiter who is allegedly responsible for the spill. 
    The move is known as a 'cross claim' - where one defendant sues another in the same case. 
    'Basically they're asking the employee to pay whatever they owe under the law to my client,' Errico explained to NorthJersey.com earlier this week. 

    The response, filed Thursday, is the latest development in a months-long bitter battle between Beyder and the Alpine Country Club.   
    Beyder was enjoying a meal at the club in Demarest on September 7, 2018, when a waiter, who has not been named, spilled red wine on her pink handbag, allegedly ruining it.  
    The plaintiff claimed in her lawsuit that the handbag was essentially irreplaceable as the style was discontinued.  
    She accused the exclusive club of being negligent when it employed the server - referred to as 'John Doe' in the suit. 
    Beyder's lawyer said she tried to sort out the matter with the country club directly for over a year, but the club stopped responding. 
    Errico acknowledged that the spill was an accident, and said the club should be held responsible.  
    'The way the story read is that somehow we're blaming the employee,' Errico said. 
    'We're not. Not at all. You go to any restaurant. You have a leather jacket on. 100 dollars. 50 dollars. 20 dollars. If a waiter spills on it and it's destroyed, you're expecting the restaurant to compensate you for that particular item.' 
    The Alpine Country Club (pictured) in Demarest, New Jersey, responded to Beyder's lawsuit by suing the waiter allegedly responsible for the spill
    The Alpine Country Club (pictured) in Demarest, New Jersey, responded to Beyder's lawsuit by suing the waiter allegedly responsible for the spill
    Merber addressed the lawsuit in a statement to DailyMail.com, which read in part: 'Alpine Country Club, its management, counsel and agents have taken Plaintiff’s allegations seriously and have acted reasonably and responsibly in response thereto.
    'Neither the Club nor its counsel or agents have ignored or refused to address Plaintiff’s complaint. 
    'The pleadings raise issues regarding the property damage Plaintiff claims she suffered, the authenticity of the handbag and its value.'  
    Beyder said she tried to sort out the matter with the country club directly for over a year, but the club stopped responding, prompting her to file the lawsuit on October 29
    Beyder said she tried to sort out the matter with the country club directly for over a year, but the club stopped responding, prompting her to file the lawsuit on October 29
    Errico also said an insurance company was also dismissive about Beyder's claim because they were surprised at the cost of the bag.  
    'It's sort of like a rich person problem. They couldn't comprehend that a bag could be that much. I think that was the biggest problem with that,' Errico said. 
    'They kind of discriminated against her that she actually owned that type of bag.'
    Hermès bags retail for tens of thousands of dollars and are favored among celebrities including the Kardashians, Cardi B and Jennifer Lopez.
    In June, a Niloticus crocodile diamond Birkin 35 sold for over $200,000 at Christie's in London.
    The Hermès Himalaya niloticus crocodile Birkin 35 is named after actress Jane Birkin who, in 1983, sat next to Hermes' chief executive Jean-Louis Dumas on a flight.
    When she complained about not being able to find a good leather weekend bag, he designed a versatile one for her to use.
    Since it was introduced in 1986, the hugely popular design has been a hit with celebrities and collectors, including Victoria Beckham, who has a collection of more than 100 Birkins said to be worth nearly $2million (£1.5million).
    The sale makes the bag the second-most expensive sold at auction in Europe, tied with a 2008 Hermes Himalaya Birkin bag which sold for the same price in June 2018. A Birkin 35 Togo can cost from $12,100 upwards.


     
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Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Miss Money Bags! The women who've made a mint by getting their hands on designer handbags that sell for hundreds of thousands

While you may think the wisest financial minds invest in property, art or the stockmarket, the savvy investor is putting their money into designer handbags.
The point was proven when a Hermes crocodile-skin Birkin bag sold at Christie's this month for an eye-watering $170,00, far exceeding its estimate of $120,000.

Here, SAMANTHA BRICK and ALICE SMELLIE speak to four women who have invested in handbags — and got a golden return...

I watch the market as others watch shares
Initial cost: $40,000
Current value: $70,000
Fashion consultant Noreen Goodwin, 47, lives in West London with her eight children. She says:

Fashion consultant Noreen Goodwin, 47, lives in West London with her eight children
Fashion consultant Noreen Goodwin, 47, lives in West London with her eight children
After the various financial scandals of the last decade, I'm not sure anyone totally trusts banks any more. But a decent collection of designer handbags can have better returns than an Isa — and bring you far more enjoyment!
I bought my first — a Dior — in my early 20s after being inspired by Princess Diana. She carried a small, quilted Dior bag, and I thought she was the epitome of sophistication.
My collection includes 30 bags from leading brands including Dior, Chanel and Bottega Veneta. I always keep an eye out for new designers such as Roksanda, whose pieces might become investments in the future, watching the bag market as others do stocks and shares. Although I'm not really a Gucci fan, I buy the odd one because they're a good bet.
Chanel can be relied upon to at least double in value, so I have some incredible pieces, including a see-through plexiglass petrol tank that I bought for £5,000 in 2014. They now sell for twice the original cost, on the rare occasions they're available.
But my favourite is a little Chanel Lego bag that I bought six years ago. I use it every week, so I've had to send it back to Chanel to be mended a few times. Even though it's so small it can't even accommodate an iPhone, prices have almost doubled to around £10,000.   
Second-hand Birkin can cost even more than a new one
Initial cost: £15,000
Current value: £80,000
Luisa Ruocco, 28, is single and lives in West London. She is a social media influencer @luisainsta and says:

Luisa Ruocco, 28, is single and lives in West London. She is a social media influencer
Luisa Ruocco, 28, is single and lives in West London. She is a social media influencer
For my 19th birthday, I told my mum the only thing I wanted was a Louis Vuitton bag. Though she never told me how much it cost at the time, I suspect it was just over £500.
It was my first designer bag and I wore it almost every day at university. I still have it, and it is now worth £1,500.
Today I own 30 luxury handbags, including six Hermes Birkins, a few classic Chanels and a couple of Yves Saint Laurent numbers. While some were gifts, I bought most of them myself. My collection is currently worth £80,000.
While many people would call this excessive, I'm content to plough my money into bags rather than a car or property.
I've never felt guilty about buying them because I know they are accruing value. They are long-term investments, so I have no immediate plans to sell.
I received my first Hermes — a cherry-red Birkin bag — in my early 20s from a generous family member. It's made out of calf leather, so it isn't worth as much as the crocodile version, but with a current value of £10,000 it's not to be sniffed at!
I bought three smaller versions of it in grey, coral and beige at auction because it's impossible to get on the Hermes waiting list.
I paid the market value of £5,000 each to make sure I got my hands on them, but since then they have risen to a value of more than £10,000 per bag.
Without question, they are my favourite. I'm always complimented on them when I take them out. Any time I cross paths with another woman who has a Birkin on her arm 'The Look' passes between us.
People may be shocked to discover that I wear such expensive bags when I am out and about, but I've done my homework and I know it's irrelevant to their resale value if they have been gently used.
A Birkin is so hard to come by that the value of a pre-owned, limited edition version is far beyond what you would ever pay in-store for a new one.
While designer outfits or shoes will always fall out of fashion and are rarely profitable to sell on, a classic handbag will always be in style and repay your investment twice, or even ten times, over. That's why investing my money in handbags makes perfect financial sense.
My car boot bargain is now worth £7k!
Initial cost: £6,000
Current value: £30,000
Ailsa Russell, 25, is single, lives in London and works as a luxury asset appraiser at Prestige Pawnbrokers. She says:

Ailsa Russell, 25, is single, lives in London and works as a luxury asset appraiser at Prestige Pawnbrokers
Ailsa Russell, 25, is single, lives in London and works as a luxury asset appraiser at Prestige Pawnbrokers
I've been collecting bags since I was 15. I would spend my weekends scouring the charity shops near my parents' home in Sussex and even pitched up at jumble sales. People may be sceptical, but boy does it pay off.
My best find to date was a battered Hermes Kelly bag at a car boot sale. I paid just £200 for it and sent it off to be repaired. Now it's worth £7,000. Today I have a collection of 20 bags including Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Mulberry and Chanel. Though they cost me just £6,000 in total, they're worth five times that sum.
I've always been financially aware, and initially I planned to invest in classic cars. But when petrol prices started creeping up, I decided to look into bags instead. It's the best decision I've ever made.
Where possible, I keep them in pristine condition and store them in their dust bags and with their authenticity cards. While I am attracted to all the bags I buy, I can't let myself be swayed emotionally. Instead, when I look at my Hermes bag I see it as a rather nice down payment for a property in the future.
I'm very careful when it comes to sourcing bags. I avoid London auction houses where everything is incredibly expensive and tend to stick to smaller regional auctions or out of the way places where things that are deemed to be 'less interesting' are sold.
I appreciate that for someone of my age it's a strange area of investment to focus on. But you won't see me complaining when I'm laughing all the way to the bank!
I know which brands will soar in value
Initial cost: £16,000
Current value: £23,000
Charlotte Staerck, 29, is married to Ben, 32. Together they run the Handbag Clinic and live in Chelsea, West London. She says:

Charlotte Staerck, 29, is married to Ben, 32. Together they run the Handbag Clinic and live in Chelsea, West London
Charlotte Staerck, 29, is married to Ben, 32. Together they run the Handbag Clinic and live in Chelsea, West London
People think that when it comes to buying a bag it's best to go for something shiny and new. But I can look at an old bag and know within seconds whether it can be restored — and so soar in value. It's why much of my collection is pre-owned.
Though I've been investing in handbags for only four years, I've got 20, and at their current market value they're worth £7,000 more than I paid.
Obviously I am a savvy shopper. I know what brands will increase in price and spend hours researching the market so I can tell what will grow in value and what won't.
I'm now an expert in authenticating handbags through my work, and it means I'm never caught out by fakes. As any lover of handbags will tell you, your first Chanel is a big achievement. A black Chanel is a timeless classic that won't ever lose its value. That's why I also have a 1994 Classic Chanel Maxi, with its huge 24-carat gold-plated CCs. I bought it for £1,800 in 2015 and it's now worth £2,800.
Precious metalwork on a designer handbag will always make a huge difference to the resale price.
Though it's not as valuble as most of the bags I own, my favourite is an orange Chanel vintage handbag from 1989. It's one I would never part with. It's like my baby! It cost me £200 and is now worth £450.
Friends do ask to borrow my bags, and normally I don't mind. However, one friend earned herself a lifetime ban after she left a YSL bag behind in a bar. That was £650 down the drain!
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