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Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Chanel and The RealReal Both Nab Wins in Latest Round of Ongoing Counterfeit Lawsuit

The RealReal and Chanel have each scored a few wins in the highly-watched trademark-centric lawsuit that the famous French brand waged against the resale giant for allegedly selling counterfeit goods, and using the Chanel name to “deceive consumers into falsely believing that [it] has some kind of approval from or an association or affiliation with Chanel [when it doesn’t] or that all CHANEL-branded goods sold by The RealReal (“TRR”) are authentic.” In response to the motion to dismiss that the San Francisco-based resale site filed last year, a New York federal court has agreed to toss out a number of Chanel’s claims, while enabling three to remain intact.
On Monday, Judge Vernon Broderick of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York granted TRR’s motion to dismiss in part, agreeing to toss out Chanel’s claims of trademark infringement, and false endorsement and unfair competition, as well as the Paris-based brand’s claims under New York State General Business Law on that basis that TRR’s “use of Chanel’s genuine trademarks is not likely to cause customer confusion, and because Chanel has not adequately alleged injury to the public at large.”
At the same time, the judge refused to dismiss Chanel’s trademark counterfeiting/infringement and false advertising claims, and similarly kept its common law unfair competition claim in play, as well because Chanel “adequately alleges that TRR marketed and sold counterfeit Chanel products, and because [TRR’s] advertising regarding the authenticity of the products it sells is literally false.”
In the recently-released opinion and order, Judge Broderick looks first to Chanel’s claims of trademark infringement, false endorsement and unfair competition, which he says Chanel “does not plausibly allege … based on [TTR’s] use of genuine Chanel trademarks” in connection with its sale of authentic Chanel products, as the Lanham Act – the federal statute that governs trademarks and unfair competition – “does not prevent one who trades a branded product from accurately describing it by its brand name, so long as the trader does not create confusion by implying an affiliation with the owner of the product.”
Here, Judge Broderick asserts that Chanel fails to successfully make its claims because it is “highly unlikely that a customer buying a secondhand Chanel product from [TRR]—which unambiguously holds itself out as consignment retailer in a luxury market— would confuse the nature of [TRR’s] business, the source of its products, or its affiliation—or lack thereof—with Chanel.”
To be exact, the judge points to the following factors as examples of why consumers are not likely to be confused about the source of the goods in question or be misled into believing there is an affiliation between TRR and Chanel given TRR’s use of Chanel’s trademarks: 1) “Chanel’s trademarks are incredibly well-known, recognizable, and prevalent in the luxury fashion market;” 2) “As Chanel makes clear in [its complaint], [it] does not sell secondhand or vintage Chanel goods, and in that sense, [TRR] does not directly compete with Chanel;” 3) “Chanel has identified no evidence of actual customer confusion, or that [TRR] has adopted the genuine Chanel trademarks in bad faith;” and 4) “the luxury fashion market is a relatively sophisticated market that … commands top-dollar prices.”
The judge similarly states that “Chanel has not plausibly alleged facts suggesting that [TRR] ‘stepped over the line into a likelihood of confusion by using [Chanel’s] mark[s] too prominently or too often, in terms of size, emphasis, or repetition,” and thereby, diminishing the merits of a nominative fair use defense. “Chanel has identified no facts suggesting that The RealReal displays Chanel-branded goods ‘more prominently than other luxury-brand goods,’” Broderick asserts, and “has offered no non-conclusory allegations to suggest that [TRR] inaccurately depicts its relationship with Chanel or Chanel’s products and services.”
This is particularly true, according to the court, given the disclosure on TRR’s website that “[b]rands identified on [its website] are not involved in the authentication of the products being sold, and none of the brands sold assumes any responsibility for any products purchased from or through the website,” and that “[b]rands sold on the [website] are not partnered or affiliated with [TRR] in any manner.”
With those claims out of the way, Judge Broderick states that Chanel does, in fact, “plead sufficient facts to plausibly allege a cause of action for trademark infringement based on [TRR’s] advertisement and sale of counterfeit Chanel products.” And while the resale site is “involved neither in the manufacture nor the affixing of [Chanel’s] trademark to [any counterfeits], its sale of the [counterfeits] [is] sufficient ‘use’ for it to be liable for the results of such infringement,” Broderick declares, due to the nature of its model.
As distinct from the Second Circuit’s finding in Tiffany Inc. v. eBay Inc., in which eBay was let off the hook for the counterfeits sold on its site, Judge Broderick says that TRR may be liable for infringement in connection with the sale of allegedly counterfeit goods because it “retains the power to reject for sale, set prices, and create marketing for goods, and unlike eBay is more than a platform for the sale of goods by vendors.”
“By adopting a business model in which [TRR] itself controls a secondary market for trademarked luxury goods, and by curating the products offered through that market and defining the terms on which customers can purchase those products, [TRR] reaps substantial benefit,” according to Judge Broderick. “As a result of this business model, [TRR] must bear the corresponding burden of the potential liability stemming from its ‘sale, offering for sale, distribution, [and] advertising of’ the goods in the market it has created.”
In terms of the alleged counterfeits sold by TRR, the court states that “Chanel has adequately averred that its own investigation revealed that [TRR] marketed and sold counterfeit Chanel products, and Chanel has also alleged that [TRR’s] own customers have complained about the receipt of counterfeit merchandise,” which is “sufficient to plausibly allege that [TRR] directly infringed Chanel’s trademark.”
Finally, as for Chanel’s false advertising claim, the court sides with the “iconic” fashion brand, determining that TRR’s “advertisements regarding the authenticity of the products it sells, considered in context, are literally false.” For instance, TRR’s statement that it “ensures that every item on [its site] is 100% the real thing” is an “unambiguous representation of fact,” per Broderick, which stands in contrast with “Chanel’s allegations that certain products advertised and sold by [TRR] are counterfeit.” As such, this “suffices to establish a plausible allegation of literal false advertising based on [TRR’s] representation that all the products it offers have been authenticated and are 100% the real thing,” thereby, enabling Chanel’s claim to move ahead along with Chanel’s unfair competition and counterfeiting/trademark infringement claims.
Chanel made headlines when it first filed suit against The RealReal in November 2018, accusing the popular resale site of “selling counterfeit CHANEL handbags,” despite its claims that it “ensure[s] that every item on[its site] is 100% the real thing.” The fashion brand went on to claim that while “there is no nor has there ever been any approval by or association or affiliation between Chanel and The RealReal …. the RealReal understands that the value of its CHANEL-branded inventory and attraction for consumers is enhanced if consumers believe that Chanel has a business relationship or affiliation with The RealReal.”
From the outset, The RealReal has vehemently denied Chanel’s claims, characterizing the brand’s suit as “nothing more than a thinly-veiled effort to stop consumers from reselling their authentic used goods, and to prevent customers from buying those goods at discounted prices.”
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Thursday, September 26, 2019

6 best vintage shops where millennials and Gen Zers are buying their Gucci, Dior and Prada handbags

The drawers in your mother’s closet are probably a treasure trove full of archival designs you can no longer find in stores. Otherwise, second-hand goods are the answer.

The interest in vintage designer bags has also grown considerably among millennials and Gen Zers. Photo: @DILN_
The interest in vintage designer bags has also grown considerably among millennials and Gen Zers. Photo: @DILN_


The year is 2019, but curiously many are dressed more like their ‘90s style icons these days. Some are even revisiting throwback fashion trends from the 2000s that we all thought should be left in the past. After dad shoes, scrunchies, bucket hats and tiny sunglasses became hot fashion items in the past two years, capri pants and biker shorts are now having a moment. The interest in vintage designer bags has also grown considerably among millennials and Gen Zers. From Fendi’s Zucca print and Dior’s signature branding, to Gucci’s house monogram and Prada’s classic, inverted triangle logo plate, retro purses are all over Instagram.
So, where can you find these old luxury handbags? The easy answer would be your mother’s wardrobe. Those drawers of hers are like a treasure trove full of archival designs you can no longer find in stores. You’ll just have to rummage through them for your dream bag, and hope that your mum doesn’t notice anything has gone missing. Just kidding.
For those who prefer a less sneaky route, we’ve rounded up a list of the six best stores to shop for designer bags online. Read on to learn where we get our second-hand goods.

The RealReal

https://www.instagram.com/p/B1RBfrEgKZB/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=dlfix 

Vestiaire Collective

Vestiaire Collective is where supermodel Karlie Kloss shops her Chanel bags, so you know it’s got to have a great selection. Another major player in the reselling market, the web store sees a vast line-up of pre-owned handbags by Prada, Fendi and the like — all available at reduced prices.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B0Qqd8-hRjM/?utm_source=ig_embed
 

What Goes Around Comes Around

https://www.instagram.com/p/B0zFUMfFt84/?utm_source=ig_embed

Luxury Garage Sale

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bp7Pu25F4xy/?utm_source=ig_embed


 If you’re a fan of designer bags but not particularly fond of the price tags they come with, then Luxury Garage Sale will be your new best friend. The upscale consignment store offers a massive range of coveted styles, including archival styles from Saint Laurent and Louis Vuitton. Check the site now to see if you can find any bargains.

Madison Avenue Couture

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bz1EIq2HaAH/?utm_source=ig_embed

The Hermès Birkin is one of the most coveted luxury handbags on the market. If that’s your ultimate dream bag, look no further than Madison Avenue Couture. The store carries a huge selection of new and preloved Birkins that are difficult to get hold of.

Rebag

https://www.instagram.com/p/B04Sw1wlncK/?utm_source=ig_embed
 

 From vintage Prada to Goyard and Balenciaga, expect to find a stunning array of statement designer handbags at vastly reduced prices on Rebag’s website. For those who live in California, Florida or New York, you may also visit Rebag’s IRL locations to see its inventory in person.

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Saturday, September 14, 2019

Why Competitor Poshmark May Be The RealReal And ThredUp’s Best Friend In Exploding Resale Market

Investment analyst Michael Binetti, Credit Suisse, is out with a bold prediction: “We believe the secondhand/resale market could grow much faster in the near-term than the +mid-teens growth that industry sources project.”
As current projections stand, the combined digitally-native resale and the traditional, largely brick-and-mortar thrift/donation secondhand fashion market will reach $51 billion by 2023, according to ThredUp, a major player in the resale fashion market and the primary source of the industry’s data.
By 2023, the resale segment is expected to account for 45% of the secondhand apparel market’s sales or $23 billion, growing from a mere 25% ($7 billion) of the total $28 billion in 2019.
The RealReal, the recently made public luxury resale company, the privately-held ThredUp, and social commerce peer-to-peer marketplace Poshmark are the current resale leaders.

On The Money Decluttering Tips


Dynamic growth in the online sales channel will be the main driver of growth, gaining twice as fast as thrift/donation or over 30% per year from 2019 to 2023. This will be thanks to consumers, most especially women, gaining awareness of the convenience of this new model as an alternative to giving bags of old clothes to Goodwill, Salvation Army or local thrift stores.
As mentioned, Credit Suisse’s Binette expects it to advance even faster, though he didn’t speculate just how much faster it will grow. However, he said, “We’ve networked extensively with management teams across the secondhand retail category and the most consistent comment we’ve heard is that the industry unanimously believes it is barely scratching the surface with the addressable market of consumers that would consider re-selling/consigning online.”

Supply, not demand is the industry’s challenge

Increasingly, women are willing to give secondhand shopping a try, with ThredUp reporting the number of women who’ve purchased secondhand has grown from 44 million in 2017 to 56 million in 2018, roughly half of all adult women.
However, the linchpin for resale’s future is getting inside people’s closets and convincing them to turn over enough good-old stuff that online buyers will want.
After all, they have been filling their closets with off-price (Marshalls, TJ Maxx), fast fashion (Zara, H&M), value chain (Walmart, Target) clothing at an aggressive pace, but this isn’t the stuff that a vibrant resale market is made on. The ThredUp study, supplemented with data from Credit Suisse, estimates that about 35% of consumers’ closets in 2018 are accounted for by clothing from these three sources and their share has grown from 28% since 2008.
Instead, the stuff consumers are most likely to want to buy in resale is department store (14% share of closet in 2018) and other specialty retail (13%) brands, which they also may want to hold onto longer. Mid-priced fashion (Gap, J.Crew) that comprises 20% share of closet today may go for ThredUp or Poshmark, but not The RealReal.
It isn’t consumer demand that could hold the fashion resalers back. It’s getting their hands on enough stuff that their customers will want. As a result, each player’s consignment strategies are critical to their future success.

Getting real is The RealReal’s key consignment strategy

The RealReal identifies unlocking the ~$200 billion of luxury goods available in the U.S. for the resale market as its greatest market opportunity, as well its most critical challenge.
“The biggest obstacle to growth for REAL is acquiring the right level and types of supply,” writes Cowen’s Oliver Chen, in a report on a recent meeting with The RealReal’s CEO Julia Wainwright and CFO Matt Gustke.
“Management highlights it is more difficult to get someone to consign for the first time,” he explains, but adds that after their first consignment, The RealReal customers typically return two-to-three times a year.
With Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Prada and Hermès its leading brands, The RealReal has found making face-to-face connections with wary luxury consumers critical to getting prime merchandise. So, it operates three stores, two in NYC and one on Melrose Avenue, Los Angeles, where well-heeled shoppers can come in and meet with authentication experts. Such personal connection raises their comfort level.
The RealReal also operates 11 locations nationwide for jewelry, watch and handbag valuations, plus the convenience of free “white glove” in-home consultation and pickup in 20 markets.
In a previous discussion with CEO Julie Wainwright, she shared that not only do the stores pave the way for better consignments, they also result in an order size twice as large as is typical online. “It is a marketing tactic and sales tactic and product acquisition tactic,” Wainwright said. “We find we get lots of high-quality consignments when we do pop-ups,” like one recently in Las Vegas.
The RealReal is approaching half a million buyers and if turning new RealReal buyers into consignors is its primary way to source new supply, it has a long runway.
According to the BCG-Altagamma True-Luxury survey among consumers who met a threshold of luxury spending (~$5,500 in past year), only half of the U.S. luxury consumers surveyed have participated in the secondhand market. Among the other half, 21% have sold and bought, 18% have purchased only and 11% have only sold.
The RealReal is still in the early days in tapping its potential market. “Resale drives a perpetual consumption cycle that fuels recurring consignments and purchases as it provides liquidity to consignors to purchase new and secondhand items – this should support solid GMV (gross merchandise value) growth over the long-term,” Chen writes.

ThredUp has it in the bag

ThredUp’s consignment strategy is literally in-the-bag with its “Clean Out Your Closet” service where a potential consigner requests a postage-paid Clean Out Kit to bag up unwanted items. These item can either be sold for cash or credit to use at Reformation or Polarn O. Pyret for childrenswear or donated to charity along with a $5 cash gift.



The company notes, however, that it is picky about what consignments it accepts: only items in pristine condition with no damage or alterations, including missing sizing information. Given those criteria, ThredUp reports it only retains about 40% of the items shipped for resale. The rejects can be returned to the sender for a small fee or donated to charity.
Right now, through October 20, ThredUp is hot on the trail for fall fashion, offering a 20% extra payout for seasonally-appropriate sweaters, coats, boots, overalls, jumpsuits and designer handbags. In-demand brands it is on the hunt for include Madewell, Patagonia, Lululemon, Everlane, Sorel, Eloquii and Torrid.
ThredUp is also crossing over into physical retail in new partnerships just announced with Macy’s and J.C. Penney. ThredUp departments will shortly open in 40 Macy’s and 30 J.C. Penney locations.
These locations will give consumers an extra dose of confidence and credibility to ThredUp when they first meet the brand there. No word that consignments will be accepted there, but one can imagine each department will have a stack of clean-out bags readily at hand.

Poshmark takes a do-It-yourself approach

Poshmark claims to be the No. 1 fashion buying and selling platform, with some 50 million sellers. A recent survey by Raymond James supports that claim, with 67% of women surveyed recognizing the Poshmark name, as compared with 44% who know ThredUp and 12% The RealReal.
But unlike ThredUp and The RealReal, Poshmark operates under a different business model. It doesn’t take possession of the clothing for sale. It works as a peer-to-peer marketplace where sellers list items and Poshmark takes a piece of the action once a sale is completed.
With its stripped-down business model, it gives sellers the tools to make sales, but also requires them to do the heavy lifting to photograph, describe, and price each item. Poshmark provides a prepaid shipping label when an item is bought, but the seller has to package it and take it to the post office to ship.
It also supports sellers with what it describes as virtual shopping parties where people gather on the app to enjoy selling events around a theme or brand. Success in fashion has given Poshmark confidence to branch out into home decor and housewares.

Awareness builds customers and consignors

To attract people to the circular fashion resale economy, both Credit Suisse’s Binetti and Cowen’s Chen identify building awareness of the potential of resale platforms like The RealReal, ThredUp and Poshmark is critical.
To create awareness, all three companies have taken to television to get the word out. In that Poshmark is the leader, running 14,872 spots in the last 30 days and ranking No. 311 in terms of overall advertising spending, according to ISpot.TV. ThredUp (2,674 airings and No. 839 in sending) and The RealReal (2,533 airings and No. 1,020 in spending) lag far behind.
And from that awareness, consignments grow. Signs are that American consumers are already lightening their load, as the ThredUp study reports consumers have reduced the number of items in their closets from 164 in 2017 to 136 in 2019. But that also means, they may have fewer choice items to pass along into the resale channel.
Ultimately Poshmark’s heavy-lifting in the awareness department may be a blessing for both ThredUp and The RealReal. After a few times a person does all the work on the back end to make a sale –or not make a sale if the price isn’t right or the description fails – my guess is that people looking to get in on the resale action may quickly turn to the frictionless and more convenient alternative that ThredUp and The RealReal offer.
Poshmark may open the door for customers to try online resale, but I bet that ThredUp and The RealReal will be the ones that will keep them around for the long haul and get the best pickings from their closets.

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Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Fashion leaders to meet at G7 summit to improve sustainability, from H&M to Gucci

 A Gucci bag, Chanel bag, Tory Burch bag outside Tory Burch on February 14, 2017 in New York City.


Fashion brands including Gucci and H&M will meet at the G7 summit this weekend in a global pact to fight the climate change crisis and improve sustainability.
The summit will see 32 fashion leaders, including Francois-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of Kering, and the owner of Zara’s parent company, Inditex, meet in Biarritz, France.
The coalition, otherwise known as “The Fashion Pact”, also includes brands such as Adidas, Burberry, Chanel, H&M, Ralph Lauren and Stella McCartney.

Representatives said its objectives draw on the Science-Based Targets (SBT1) initiative, which focuses on action in three essential areas for safeguarding the planet – stopping global warming, restoring biodiversity and protecting the oceans.
“The idea of engaging at the G7 level is also around getting the commitment at the governmental level to address these types of concerns with a sense of urgency,” Michael Beutler, director of sustainability operations at Kering, told Vogue Business last month.

The meeting comes months after French President Emmanuel Macron called on Pinault to bring together a group of brands to set unified sustainability goals for the sector.
“We have to work collectively,” Pinault told the Copenhagen Fashion Summit in May. “It’s about a few leaders who are willing to put themselves in an uncomfortable situation to force themselves to move.”
In recent months, Pinault has worked to bring together a coalition of industry leaders wanting to come together and set goals to reduce the industry’s negative impact on the environment.
“The mandate is really to move the sector,” Marie-Claire Daveu, Kering’s chief sustainability officer, added. “The G7 is a starting point.”

Kering has been a key leader when it comes to addressing the industry’s sustainability issues.
In May, the global luxury fashion company – which manages brands including Saint Laurent, Gucci and Balenciaga – published new animal welfare standards that included a list of requirements for the treatment of cattle, calves, sheep and goats throughout their entire lives, as well as guidelines for abattoirs.

In addition, it pledged to stop hiring models under the age of 18 on its catwalk and in advertising campaigns.

“We are conscious of the influence exerted on younger generations in particular by the images produced by our houses,” Pinault said at the Copenhagen summit. “We believe that we have a responsibility to put forward the best possible practices in the luxury sector and hope to create a movement that will encourage others to follow.”
The policy will come into effect early next year, in time for the autumn/winter collections.
Last month, Inditex announced a pledge to use purely sustainable fabric in its clothing by 2025 as part of a wider strategy focusing on sustainability.

The company aims for all cotton, linen and polyester used by the group to be organic, sustainable or recycled by 2025.
“Sustainability is a neverending task in which everyone here at Inditex is involved and in which we are successfully engaging all of our suppliers,” said chief executive Pablo Isla.
Moreover, the company stated that 80 per cent of the energy used in running the company (stores, logistics centres and offices) should be renewable by 2022.

As for recycling, the fashion conglomerate will supply all stores with containers to collect clothes and a pick-up service – already active in China and Spain – at home to be expanded to Paris, London and New York later this year.
The news came amid the formation of a new All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) to analyse sustainability in the clothing and textiles industry in the UK.
With the new APPG, which is supported by sustainability charity Hubbub, MPs from all political backgrounds will come together to review supply chains, materials used, and consumer behaviours.


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Sunday, August 18, 2019

Flats That Work As Hard As You Do

 

Flats that will work as hard as you do

  • The search for comfortable work flats can be a real struggle, but the solutions are too
  • New York’s women speak up about the three styles of ballerinas, loafers and clogs


If you are a woman who works, chances are you have struggled with footwear.
Maybe you have commuted in one pair and then changed into another when you got to your desk. Maybe, over the years, you have built a collection of not just shoes, but also tiny socks of different shapes and sizes—socks that barely cover your toes, that aren’t supposed to peek out of your shoes but inevitably do, that are like tiny little stockings, or with a glue bit on the cuff to hold them in place. Maybe you have stared at the feet of the women you see on the subway or in your office and wondered, “Did she actually walk here in those shoes?" Maybe, like me, you have actually stopped several of these women to ask them that question, and if the answer is, “Yes, these are comfortable enough to walk in and they look good with my professional attire," followed up with another inquiry: “Who makes them? Would you spell that, please?"
Climbing the male-dominated corporate ladder is hard enough on its own. It’s even worse in bad shoes.
Women looking for the right pair have no shortage of options. The US women’s footwear market was $33.9 billion (around 2.4 trillion) for the 12 months ended April, according to the NPD Group/Consumer Tracking Service. The most growth is coming from the sport leisure category—but even fashion, which had been declining, is now levelling out, thanks to those brands incorporating comfort.

So what brand is doing it best?
There is no single answer: For every woman who swears by her Rothy’s, there is another who bemoans the $125 wasted on yet another pair of toe-scrunching, back-of-the-ankle-tearing shoes. While some women are willing to go through the pain of breaking in a pair of Everlane Day Gloves, others don’t have the patience.
We spoke, emailed and DMed on Twitter with dozens of women, including fashion experts, lawyers, journalists and an array of other professionals. There were few consensus items, but plenty of passion. Here are some in three broad categories that get rave reviews.

The Ballerina
There is a reason Chanel flats have been ubiquitous for so long. If you are ready and able to spend $700 on a single pair of shoes, no one style comes more roundly recommended than the lambskin. The supple leather makes them comfortable right away, without the dreaded rubbing that can happen with the fashion house’s other styles and leathers.
For those not looking to spend quite that much money, Attilio Giusti Leombruni (or AGL) also makes a ballerina flat, though some breaking in is to be expected.
If the rounded toe shape isn’t your style, try the pointier-toed Barneys New York Suede & Mesh flats, recommended by Marina Larroude, vice-president and fashion director at Barneys New York. “The mesh of the ballerina is very soft in the feet, super comfortable, and light, especially during the summer," she says.
The snakeskin CC Corso Como skimmer is one of Nordstrom’s most popular stylish and comfortable flats, says Kate Bellman, director of Nordstrom’s fashion office, though it’s available in many materials and colours.

The Loafer
No shoe quite says “ready for business" as a loafer does. The classic Gucci menswear style is recommended by Erica Russo, vice-president and fashion director of accessories and beauty at Bloomingdale’s. “I love this style because the leather will give over time, making this a great fit," she explains. Every Gucci loafer-wearing woman that Bloomberg spoke with praises its immediate comfort as well.
For something a little more fashion-forward, try the Noelle loafers from The Row. “The soft suede makes them really easy wearing, right out of the box," says Rati Levesque, chief operating officer of luxury consignment site RealReal.
Many women also said they were major fans of the Cole Haan brand, which offers several loafers.

The Clog
Clogs are not always flats, but they are comfortable enough to have migrated from nurse wear to streetwear and stayed put for some years. They are not suited for long walks, says Adam Farber, owner of comfort-focused, independent shoe store Mark Adrian Shoes in Gloucester, Massachusetts, but they are a good choice for anyone who logs many hours on their feet. Farber likes Dansko best, but brands such as Swedish Hasbeens, No.6 Store, Nina Z and Rachel Comey offer a range of colours, styles and heel heights.

The Secret to Finding the Right Fit
When it comes to shoes, many women don’t realize that, as with the rest of their bodies, sizes can shift.
“Feet change over time; they get larger, wider and longer," Farber says. “It’s really important not to be married to a number." That means that even a shoe that fits one year might not work the next.
“People are constantly fitting themselves incorrectly, and the fit is almost as important as the structure of the shoe itself," he continues, recommending that shoppers get fitted by an expert and try everything in person as much as possible.
Nordstrom’s Bellman agrees: “It’s important to know the shape of your arch and work with a certified shoe fitter to identify the best support for your foot" (the service is complimentary at the retailer). “Foot pain often comes from improper arch support, but there are many shoes available that provide architectural arch support technology that alleviates discomfort. Lastly, a flexible sole will encourage proper movement and gait."
The right fit means that there should be a thumbnail’s worth of space between your toe and the front of the shoe, felt by someone else, says Farber. A little bit of heel slippage at the beginning is to be expected. A snug fit is not the goal.
For those logging the most miles, a slip-on flat is not the right choice. “You want a ‘seatbelt,’ something that’s going to keep the shoe on your foot so you are not scrunching your toes up to keep the shoe on," he says. That can cause heel pain known as plantar fasciitis.
In addition, he cautions, even the best shoes aren’t necessarily perfect for you right out of the box. Farber says a good shoe can take as much as a week to break in. Start with an hour on Day 1, 2 or 3 hours on Day 2, and so on.
Remember, most retailers won’t accept the return of a shoe worn outside. So choose your store with its return policy in mind and wear a shoe indoors before you take the leap into the great outdoors.
With assistance from Kim Bhasin

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Luxury House, Chanel, Apologizes for Designer Boomerang

chanel boomerang
Chanel has come under fire for selling a $1,325 boomerang carrying the brand’s distinct double C symbol and smooth black finish. Made of wood and resin, people are taking offense not just at the outrageous price tag but how the luxury label is appropriating an object that’s an integral part of Australian indigenous culture.
A Chanel spokesperson offered some sort of apology for the product, “Chanel is extremely committed to respecting all cultures, and regrets that some might have been offended.” Pretty weak, if you ask me, and unconvincing given how there is no move to pull the product from Chanel’s current line.
A boomerang was used as a hunting tool by the aboriginal Australians and is a symbol of their history. Aboriginal artist Bibi Barba told the BBC, “They are a cultural symbol for us. A lot of indigenous artists do artwork on them and this artwork is different in different parts of the country, it holds different meaning.”
It also comes off as tone-deaf from the brand as groups in Australia have long been fighting against selling souveneir boomerangs in airports and gift shops as they are oft made by a mass-production company that’s not even based in Australia.
Currently, this designer iteration of the tool is part of Chanel’s spring/summer 2017 pre-collection which also boasts of $425 tennis balls, a tennis racket, and a paddle.
[Allure]

 

Photo courtesy of Chanel

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